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Patterdale Breed Standard

page updated October 13th, 2007
email RENEE@PITTRPATTER.COM 425-432-1216
 
PTCA Breed Standard

PTCA Breed Standard

Patterdale Breed Standard

PTCA Breed Standard (revised sometime after August 2007)


GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Patterdale Terrier is a tough, active terrier and should give a compact, well balanced image. Height should be between 10" to 15" measured at the shoulders. Weight should be proportionate, presenting neither a "weedy" or "clunky" image.

Scars received while working will not be penalized and should be considered a badge of honor. In conformation evaluation, with all things being equal ...a terrier with working scars should be given preference over a terrier with none.


CHEST

As a working terrier, the Patterdale must be able to follow it's quarry through small tunnels.

If the chest is too big, the terrier will not be able to complete it's job efficiently.

As a general rule, you should be able to "hand span" the terrier's chest with the fingers of both hands touching.

BACK

The back should be strong and level, with length in proportion to the dogs height.

If the back is too short the terrier may not be flexible enough to move around underground.

LEGS

The legs should be straight, with good bone. The feet turning neither in or out.

The rear should have good angulation, with the hocks turning neither in or out.

HEAD AND MUZZLE

The head should give the impression of strength and be in proportion to the rest of the body. The muzzle should not appear snippy or too blocky.

TEETH

The teeth should meet in a sissors bite, however a level bite is acceptable.

Undershot or overshot is a fault, and should be considered in the working context.

Teeth lost or broken while working will not be penalized.

EARS

Button ear, with tight fold, and tips of ears meeting the skull at the corner of the eye.

NECK

The neck should be muscular and proportionate to the head and body.

TAIL

The tail should be set high on rump. It should not be carried over the back.

If you choose to dock, no more than 1/4 should be removed. As an adult, approximately a "palm's width" is preferable, should provide a good "hand-hold".

COAT

The coat may be "Smooth", "Broken" or "Rough".
All types should be dense and coarse.

Smooth: Coarse, overall very short, smooth

Broken: Coarse, longer hair on body except for head and ears which is smooth. May be some longer whiskering on muzzel and chin.

Rough: Coarse, longer hair overall, including face and ears

COLOR

Colors include: Black, Red, Chocolate, or Black and Tan

(There may be some variations in the primary colors.  For instance, blacks may have some lighter hairs in the undercoat and red may range from tan to deep red, chocolate may be a very dark or lighter brown and black and tan may have more or less of these colors on each individual dog, but the only registerable colors are those listed above)                        

Chocolate-colored dogs will have a brown nose.
(Officially called a "red" nose)

Some white on chest and feet is acceptable.

HEIGHT AND WEIGHT

Height may range from 10 to 15 inches.
Weight should be proportionate to the terrier's height.

A very muscular dog will weigh more than it looks.

You should be able to feel the ribs, but not see them.

DISQUALIFICATIONS

(1) Cryptorchid

(2) Shyness or viciousness

Terriers with these disqualifications should not be bred.

 

REVISED AUGUST 2007

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Patterdale Terrier is a tough, active terrier and should give a compact, well balanced image. Height should be between 10" to 13" measured at the shoulders. Weight should be proportionate, presenting neither a "weedy" or "clunky" image.

Scars received while working will not be penalized and should be considered a badge of honor. In conformation evaluation, with all things being equal ...a terrier with working scars should be given precedence over a terrier with none.


CHEST

As a working terrier, the Patterdale must be able to follow it's quarry through small tunnels.

If the chest is too big, the terrier will not be able to complete it's job efficiently.

As a general rule, you should be able to "hand span" the terrier's chest with the fingers of both hands touching.

BACK

The back should be strong and level, with length in proportion to the dogs height.

If the back is too short the terrier may not be flexible enough to move around underground.

LEGS

The legs should be straight, with good bone. The feet turning neither in or out.

The rear should have good angulation, with the hocks turning neither in or out.

HEAD AND MUZZLE

The head should give the impression of strength and be in proportion to the rest of the body. The muzzle should not appear snippy or too blocky.

TEETH

The teeth should meet in a sissors bite, however a level bite is acceptable.

Undershot or overshot is a fault, and should be considered in the working context.

Teeth lost or broken while working will not be penalized.

EARS

Button ear, with tight fold, and tips of ears meeting the skull at the corner of the eye.

NECK

The neck should be muscular and proportionate to the head and body.

TAIL

The tail should be set high on rump. It should not be carried over the back.

If you choose to dock, no more than 1/4 should be removed. As an adult, approximately a "palm's width" is preferable, should provide a good "hand-hold".

COAT

The coat may be "Smooth" or "Rough".
Both types should be dense and coarse.

COLOR

Colors include: Black, Red, Chocolate, or Black and Tan.

Chocolate-colored dogs may have a liver-colored nose.
(Officially called a "red" nose)

Some white on chest and feet is acceptable.

HEIGHT AND WEIGHT

Height may range from 10 to 13 inches.
Weight should be proportionate to the terrier's height.

A very muscular dog will weigh more than it looks.

You should be able to feel the ribs, but not see them.

DISQUALIFICATIONS

(1) Cryptorchid

(Neutered dogs or spayed bitches are not prohibited from conformation, as it does not affect their ability to work).

(2) Shyness or viciousness

Terriers with these disqualifications should not be bred.

PTCA PATTERDALE STANDARD PRIOR TO AUGUST 2007

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Patterdale Terrier is a tough, active terrier and should give a compact, well balanced image. Height should be between 10" to 13" measured at the shoulders. Weight should be proportionate, presenting neither a "weedy" or "clunky" image.

Scars received while working will not be penalized and should be considered a badge of honor. In conformation evaluation, with all things being equal ...a terrier with working scars should be given precedence over a terrier with none.


CHEST

As a working terrier, the Patterdale must be able to follow it's quarry through small tunnels.

If the chest is too big, the terrier will not be able to complete it's job efficiently.

As a general rule, you should be able to "hand span" the terrier's chest with the fingers of both hands touching.

BACK

The back should be strong and level, with length in proportion to the dogs height.

If the back is too short the terrier may not be flexible enough to move around underground.

LEGS

The legs should be straight, with good bone. The feet turning neither in or out.

The rear should have good angulation, with the hocks turning neither in or out.

HEAD AND MUZZLE

The head should give the impression of strength and be in proportion to the rest of the body. Two types of head may be prevalent; a Bull terrier influence or a Lakeland terrier influence.

The muzzle should not appear snippy.

TEETH

The teeth should meet in a sissors bite, however a level bite is acceptable.

Undershot or overshot is a fault, and should be considered in the working context.

Teeth lost or broken while working will not be penalized.

EARS

Button ear, with tight fold, and tips of ears meeting the skull at the corner of the eye.

NECK

The neck should be muscular and proportionate to the head and body.

TAIL

The tail should be set high on rump. It should not be carried over the back.

If you choose to dock, no more than 1/4 should be removed. As an adult, approximately a "palm's width" is preferable, should provide a good "hand-hold".

COAT

The coat may be "Smooth" or "Rough".
Both types should be dense and coarse.

prior to 2007 it read this way

The coat may be "Smooth" or "Broken".
Both types should be dense and coarse.

COLOR

Colors include: Black, Red, Chocolate, or Black and Tan.

Chocolate-colored dogs may have a liver-colored nose.
(Officially called a "red" nose)

Some white on chest and feet is acceptable.

HEIGHT AND WEIGHT

Height may range from 10 to 13 inches.
Weight should be proportionate to the terrier's height.

A very muscular dog will weigh more than it looks.

You should be able to feel the ribs, but not see them.

DISQUALIFICATIONS

(1) Cryptorchid

(Neutered dogs or spayed bitches are not prohibited from conformation, as it does not affect their ability to work).

(2) Shyness or viciousness

Terriers with these disqualifications should not be bred.

Note: This is what I found From the PTCA website regarding nose color using the link button patterdale photos:  "Only the chocolate-color Patterdale may have a red nose. "

http://www.ptca.00go.com/  click here for PTCA website

 

United Kennel Club Breed Standard for the Patterdale Terrier

click here for website  www.ukcdogs.com

PATTERDALE TERRIER
Official U.K.C. Breed Standard
Copyright 1995, United Kennel Club, Inc
Revised August 1, 2007






HISTORY
    The Patterdale Terrier is descended mainly from the black, smooth-coated Fell Terrier which was developed in the harsh environment of Northern England. The Fell Terriers were used to control vermin that were predatory on sheep. They were bred to bolt the quarry out of the den or to dispatch it if it chose to fight. Its characteristics result in an extremely game, ‘tough as nails’ dog.

    The Patterdale Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club on January 1, 1995.

GENERAL APPEARANCE
    A sturdy, tough, active little terrier that presents a compact, balanced image. As a working terrier, it has to be capable of squeezing through very small passages underground to follow its quarry. The Patterdale’s chest should be capable of being spanned behind the shoulders by an average man’s hands with the fingers of both hands touching.

    Patterdales stand between 10 and 15 inches tall at the withers.

    This breed is worked far more than it is shown, and breeders are primarily concerned with the practicality of the breed. This terrier must have a strong neck, powerful jaws and teeth, the fortitude to hold its quarry at bay, and the ability to squeeze into tight burrows. He must have great flexibility and endurance.

    Scars resulting from wounds received while working are considered honorable and are not to be penalized.

CHARACTERISTICS
    The Patterdale is an extremely courageous working terrier, traditionally used to go to ground. Patterdales are extremely willing to work and have a high desire to please. They are very active and have a strong prey drive; and though they should be peaceful with humans, livestock and other dogs, they are not a dog for the average pet owner. They require an owner with a sense of humor and one that understands and can tolerate a real terrier temperament.

HEAD
    The head is strong and powerful, in balance with the size of the dog, and wedge or trapezoidal shaped when viewed from the front. The length of the skull and the muzzle are equal, or with the muzzle slightly shorter than the skull. Jowl and muzzle have good substance. The muzzle should be strong, never appearing snipy or weak.

    TEETH - A full complement of strong, white teeth meet in a scissor or level bite. Teeth that are broken, or incisors that are lost, due to working, are not to be penalized.

    EYES – The eyes are set squarely in the skull and fairly wide apart. As an earth-working terrier, it is important that the eyes not protrude or bulge. Eye color should be in harmony with the coat color, but never blue.

    EARS – The ears are triangular in shape, and small to moderate in size, folding tightly just above the skull. The tips point to the outside corner of the eye.

    NOSE - Black except in the liver-colored dogs, which have a red nose.

NECK
    The neck is clean, muscular and of moderate length, widening gradually from the nape and blending smoothly into the shoulders.

    Faults: Ewe neck, neck too short or too thick.

FOREQUARTERS
    The shoulder is long, sloping and well laid back.

    FORELEGS - The forelegs are strong and straight, with good bone. The elbows are set close to the body but move freely. Pasterns are powerful and flexible.

    Faults: Bowed legs; fiddle front; down in pasterns; toes turned out; knuckling over or any other misalignment of joints; out at the elbow.

BODY
    In proportion, the body should be square or slightly longer than tall, measured from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttocks, and from the withers to the ground. The back is of moderate length and level, blending into a muscular, slightly arched loin that has slight to moderate tuck up.

    The chest should be firm yet flexible, deep to the level of the elbow but moderate in width and oval in shape.

    SPANNING - Spanning is an important part of the judging process for the Patterdale Terrier. They must be spanned to test for size, compression and flexibility. The Patterdale should be capable of being spanned directly behind the shoulders by an average sized mans hands. When spanning, lift the front legs off the ground or table and gently squeeze the bottom of the chest to be certain that the chest will compress.

    Faults: Chest too deep or wide, incapable of being spanned or lacking the ability to compress. Body too cobby or barrel shaped, causing lack of flexibility of the back.

HINDQUARTERS
    The hindquarters are strong and muscular. Bone, angulation and musculature match that of the forequarters.

    HINDLEGS - The stifles are well bent and the hocks are well let down. When the dog is standing, the short, strong rear pasterns are perpendicular to the ground, and when viewed from the rear they are parallel to one another.

TAIL
    The tail is set high but not carried over the back. If docked, only one-quarter to one-third should be removed, as sometimes the tail is the only means of pulling the dog out of a burrow. The tail should be strong but not overly thick. There is no preference between docked or natural.

    Serious Fault: Gay tail, carried forward over the back.

    Disqualification: Bob tail.

COAT
    The coat may be smooth or broken. In both coat types, there should be a short, dense undercoat. Very little grooming is required to keep the coat healthy.
    Smooth - hair is coarse, dense and stiff, falling back in place when lifted. No wave is present.

    Broken - an intermediate coat, having longer guard hairs than the smooth coat. The guard hairs are coarse and wiry and may be wavy. A broken coated dog may or may not have face furnishings which form a beard, moustache and eyebrows.

    A correct coat is important for protection against the wet underground and briars. Dogs with damaged coat sections that are due to hunting scars or abrasions should not be penalized in the show ring as long as overall texture can be determined.

    Serious Fault: Coat in any climate that is soft, long or downy in texture.

COLOR
    Acceptable colors include black, red, liver, grizzle, black and tan, and bronze, either solid or with some white markings on chest and feet.

    Disqualification: Any patch or spot of white marking on the body or head. Not to be confused with scarring which can cause white hairs to grow in.

HEIGHT & WEIGHT
    The Patterdale Terrier ranges in height from 10 to 15 inches at the withers. Weight should be in proportion to height, with dogs always shown in hard, fit, working condition with no excess fat.

GAIT
    When trotting, the gait is effortless, smooth, powerful, and well-coordinated, showing good but not exaggerated reach and drive. The topline remains level, with only a slight flexing to indicate suppleness. Viewed from any position, legs turn neither in nor out, nor do feet cross or interfere with each other. As speed increases, feet tend to converge toward centerline of balance.

    Movement faults should be penalized to the extent that they would interfere with the terrier’s ability to work efficiently.

DISQUALIFICATIONS
    Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Albinism. Bob tail. Any patch or spot of white marking on the body or head. (Not to be confused with scarring which can cause white hairs to grow in.)

 

Prior UKC standard

PATTERDALE TERRIER
Official U.K.C. Breed Standard
Copyright 1995, United Kennel Club, Inc
Revised July 1, 2007

HISTORY

The Patterdale Terrier is descended mainly from the black, smooth coated Fell Terrier that was developed in the harsh environment of Northern England. The Fell Terriers were used to control the fox that were predatory on sheep. Unlike the hunt terriers in Southern England, which are typified by the modern Jack Russell, the Fell Terriers were bred to bolt the fox out of the den or to dispatch it if it chose to fight. This characteristic resulted in an extremely game, ‘tough as nails’ dog.

The Patterdale Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club on January 1, 1995.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

A sturdy, tough, active little terrier that presents a compact, balanced image. As a working terrier, it has to be capable of squeezing through very small passages underground to follow its quarry. The Patterdale’s chest should be capable of being spanned behind the shoulders by an average man’s hands with the fingers of both hands touching.

Patterdales stand between 10 and 15 inches tall at the withers. The variety in size is due to different-sized dogs being used on different quarry. In Great Britain, all sizes are used. In the eastern United States, the smaller dogs are preferred for groundhogs. In the western United States, the larger dogs are used on raccoons and badger.

This breed is worked far more than it is shown, and breeders are primarily concerned with the practicality of the breed, which means having a strong neck, powerful jaws and teeth, staying power at bay, the ability to squeeze into tight burrows and durability and endurance.

Scars resulting from wounds received while working are considered honorable and are not to be penalized.

CHARACTERISTICS

The Patterdale is a working terrier traditionally used to go to ground; and that is extremely courageous. They are extremely willing to work and have a high desire to please. They are very active and have a strong prey drive, and though they should be peaceful with humans, livestock and other dogs, they are not a dog for the average pet owner. They require an owner with a sense of humor and one that understands and can tolerate a real terrier temperament.

HEAD

The head is strong and powerful, in balance with the size of the dog. Due to there being a number of different breeds that influenced the development of the Patterdale, head structure in the breed is inconsistent. There are Lakeland and Border Terrier types as well as Staffordshire Terrier types. It is important that in any style of head, the muzzle should be strong, never appearing snipy or weak.

TEETH - A full complement of strong, white teeth meet in a scissors or level bite. Teeth that are broken, or incisors that are lost, due to working, are not to be penalized.

EARS - The ears are button, with a tight fold. The tips point to the outside corner of the eye.

NOSE - Black, except in the liver-colored dogs, which have a red nose.

NECK

The neck is clean, muscular and of moderate length, widening gradually from the nape and blending smoothly into the shoulders.

Faults: Ewe neck, neck too short or too thick.

FOREQUARTERS

The shoulder blades and upper arms are long and sloping, forming an angle of nearly 90 degrees.

FORELEGS - The forelegs are strong, straight and moderately well boned. The elbows set close to the body but move freely. Pasterns are powerful and flexible.

Faults: Bowed legs; fiddle front; down in pasterns; toes turned out; knuckling over or any other misalignment of joints; out at the elbow.

BODY

In proportion, the body should be square or slightly longer than tall, measured from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttocks. and from the withers to the ground. The back is of moderate length and level, blending into a muscular, slightly arched loin that has slight to moderate tuck up. The skin on the body should be thick and fit tightly.

The chest should be firm yet flexible, deep to the level of the elbow but moderate in width and oval in shape.

SPANNING - Spanning is an important part of the judging process for the Patterdale Terrier. They must be spanned to test for size, compression and flexibility. The Patterdale should be capable of being spanned directly behind the shoulders by an average-sized man’s hands. When spanning, lift the front legs off the table and gently squeeze the bottom of the chest to be certain that the chest will compress.

Faults: Chest too deep or wide, incapable of being spanned or lacking the ability to compress. Body too cobby or barrel shaped, causing lack of flexibility of the back.

HINDQUARTERS

The hindquarters are strong and muscular. Bone, angulation and musculature match that of the forequarter.

HIND LEGS - The stifles are well bent, and the hocks are well let down. When the dog is standing, the short, strong rear pasterns are perpendicular to the ground; and when viewed from the rear they are parallel to one another.

TAIL

The tail is set high but not carried over the back. If docked, only ¼ to 1/3 should be removed, as sometimes the tail is the only means for pulling the dog out of a burrow. The tail should be strong, but not overly thick. There is no preference between docked or natural.

Serious Fault: Gay tail, carried forward over the back.

Disqualification: Bob tail.

COAT

The coat may be smooth or broken. In both coat types, there should be a short, dense undercoat, and a very dense, consistent, wiry outer coat. Some grooming is required to keep the coat healthy.

SMOOTH - Dense and stiff, falling back in place when lifted. Some wave may be present.

BROKEN - an intermediate coat, having longer guard hairs than the smooth coat. A broken coated dog may or may not have face furnishings which form a beard, moustache and eyebrows.

A correct coat is important for protection against the wet underground and briars. Dogs with damaged coat sections that are due to hunting scars or abrasions should not be penalized in the show ring as long as overall texture can be determined.

Serious Fault: Coat in any climate that is soft, long or downy in texture.

COLOR

Acceptable colors include black, red, liver, grizzle, black and tan, and seal (traditionally known as bronze), either solid or with some white markings on chest and feet.

Disqualification: Any patch or spot of white marking on the body or head. Not to be confused with scarring which can cause white hairs to grow in.

HEIGHT & WEIGHT

The Patterdale Terrier ranges in height from 10 to 15 inches at the withers. Weight should be in proportion to height, within a range of approximately 10-20 pounds.

This is a guideline, as different-sized dogs will excel at hunting different game; however, much deviation from this range is to be discouraged. Dogs should always be shown in hard, fit working condition, with no excess fat.

GAIT

When trotting, the gait is effortless, smooth, powerful, and well coordinated, showing good but not exaggerated reach and drive. The backline remains level with only a slight flexing to indicate suppleness. Viewed from any position, legs turn neither in nor out, nor do feet cross or interfere with each other. As speed increases, feet tend to converge toward centerline of balance.

Movement faults should be penalized to the extent that they would interfere with the terrier’s ability to work efficiently.

DISQUALIFICATIONS

Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Albinism. Bob tail. Any patch or spot of white marking on the body or head. Not to be confused with scarring which can cause white hairs to grow in.

Prior UKC breed standard

PATTERDALE TERRIER     UKC Breed Standard   
Official U.K.C. Breed Standard
Copyright 1995, United Kennel Club, Inc


History                                                          

In Yorkshire and the lake districts of England, where the Patterdale Terrier was developed, it is to this day referred to as a "type" of terrier rather than a distinct breed. Adhering to the philosophy of breeding working stock to working stock, the Patterdale's fanciers believe only in producing a true working terrier.

The Patterdale is a working terrier, bred originally to go to ground and bolt or kill vermin. This requires a small, active, game terrier, and must be judged as such.

The Patterdale Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club on January 1, 1995.

General Appearance and Characteristics                                                          

A sturdy, tough, active, little terrier. As a working terrier, it has to be capable of squeezing through very small passages underground to follow its quarry. A big terrier can cut off its own air supply. Therefore, its chest is not too big.

The dog presents a compact, balanced image, with straight legs.

Scars resulting from wounds received while working are considered honorable and are not to be penalized.

Head and Skull                                                          

The head and muzzle are strong and powerful.

TEETH - A full complement of strong, white teeth meet in a level bite. Teeth broken, or incisors lost, while working are not to be penalized.

EARS - The moderate size ears fold to the side of the cheeks.

Neck                                                          

The strong, muscular neck is of moderate length. A strong neck helps as much as a strong jaw in killing vermin.

Body                                                          

The body conveys an active appearance. The chest is not too big, capable of being spanned behind the shoulders by average-size hands. The strong, straight back is in proportion to the height. Not too long, not too short. Too short a back in proportion to the terrier's weight makes him awkward underground.

Tail                                                          

The tail is set high. Its length is in proportion to the body, usually about five to seven inches in length. The tail is sometimes the only thing by which to pull a terrier out when you have dug down to him.

Coat                                                          

The coat may be smooth or broken coated. Smooth-coated dogs have a dense coat.

A good coat is important to protect against the wet underground and briars.

Color                                                          

Acceptable colors include: Black, red; liver (with a red nose); grizzle, black and tan; bronze. Ninety-five percent of the breed will produce black-colored dogs, but the odd dog of all colors will come with white feet and chest. Some of the best ones are marked like this.

Height and Weight                                                          

Height range is from 11 to 15 inches.

Weight ranges from 10 to 17 pounds. The dogs weigh more than they look.

Disqualifications                                                          

Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Albinism.

 

 

 












 



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